Monthly Archives: December 2005

It was ever thus …

From W.B. Yeats, writing in the reading room of the National Library of Ireland in 1892: The glacial weight of scholasticism is over the room and over all the would-be intellectual life of Dublin. Nobody in this great library is doing any disinterested reading, nobody is poring over any book for the sake of the … Continue reading It was ever thus …

In perpetuity

I mentioned Cathy Marshall’s interesting talk about the persistence of our digital belongings. So much more of our experience now leaves digital traces: will these traces be available to rekindle those experiences in the future? Help is at hand! I now notice that Flickr offers “Permanent archiving of high-resolution original images” as part of its … Continue reading In perpetuity

On cataloging, the semantic web and hairstyles

Cathy Marshall spoke at OCLC the other day. Her topic was the long term fate of our personal digital belongings, digital belongings that are increasingly important to us as traces of a life. She spoke about the pleasures of ‘re-encounter’, the pleasure of remembering experience as recorded in photographs, letters and other traces. If we … Continue reading On cataloging, the semantic web and hairstyles

On demand services ..

I wonder will we see on-demand library systems emerge. I am thinking of services like salesforce.com (the poster child of the on-demand software phenomenon, it provides Customer Relationship Management services) or webex.com (a conferencing and online meeting provider). The idea here is that rather than installing local instances of an application (CRM or conferencing/meeting management … Continue reading On demand services ..

QOTD

I have just reread Paul Graham’s piece on Web 2.0 which has some nice things in it, including: But there is a common thread. Web 2.0 means using the web the way it’s meant to be used. The “trends” we’re seeing now are simply the inherent nature of the web emerging from under the broken … Continue reading QOTD

Repository frameworks

Herbert Van de Sompel and colleagues at LANL have been writing about the aDORe architecture for a while (see [pdf] for example). They have now released software to implement an aDORe archive. The aDORe Archive is a write-once/read-many storage approach for Digital Objects and their constituent datastreams. The approach combines two interconnected file-based storage mechanisms … Continue reading Repository frameworks

Games and digital libraries

The relationship between gaming and education, and more specifically, between gaming and libraries, is of growing interest. John Kirriemuir has a background working with digital library initiatives and is currently researching gaming environments and behavior in an educational context. He has an article in the current D-Lib magazine talking about games and information services. Though … Continue reading Games and digital libraries

University IP

I had not come across ip2ipo before. This is a UK company which partners with universities to exploit their IP in new ventures. It has a prestigious list of partners. UK universities are originators of some of the best novel intellectual property (“IP”) in the world. IP2IPO’s business is to generate commercial value from IP … Continue reading University IP

On demand book search

Thinking about book content indexing again …. John Battelle announced the Alexa Web Search Platform on his blog earlier today. In short, Alexa, an Amazon-owned search company started by Bruce Gilliat and Brewster Kahle (and the spider that fuels the Internet Archive), is going to offer its index up to anyone who wants it. Alexa … Continue reading On demand book search

Stanford and Google Book Search

Stanford has posted a document outlining the scope and rationale of its participation in the Google Book Search initiative. Google began scanning works from Stanford in approximately March of 2005. Stanford has selected its federal government collection as the first set of works to be scanned under the project; these works are in the public … Continue reading Stanford and Google Book Search